Caution: Caveman Cooking

Recipes so easy, even a … Well, you know!

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

Posted by Caveman Cooking on May 14, 2015

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales
While this is a labor intensive recipe, and I’m all about the easy, it isn’t a very difficult dish to pull off. Besides, if you gather the whole Caveclan together for an assembly line when it comes time to actually fill and roll the tamales, it goes by very quickly. Plus, when you finally unwrap one and take a bite, you’ll forget about all the steps involved!

INGREDIENTS

Masa (Dough):
3 Cups Tamal (Instant Masa Mix)
3 Cups Vegetable Stock
1 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1 Teaspoon Salt
1 1/3 Cups Vegetable Shortening
3/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

Relleno (Filling):
10 Ounces Mexican Melting Cheese – Shredded (I prefer Manchego or Oaxaca; can substitute Jack)
1/2 Cup Canned Chilies – Diced
1/2 Cup Salsa Verde

1 Package Hoja (Dried Corn Husks)

RECIPE

Cover the Hoja (corn husks) with cool water for 30-40 minutes. When thoroughly soaked, squeeze excess water out then place into a colander to allow rest of excess water to drip out. Do not let the husks dry completely – they must be moist and pliable when wrapping the tamales.
HINT: Place a heavy plate on top of the husks so that they stay completely submerged.
Soaking The Hoja (Corn Husks)

Place shortening into mixer and whip it until silky (3-4 minutes). Yes, Devo fans. I said, whip it. Whip it good!
Whipped Shortening

Meanwhile, place all the dry ingredients (Tamal, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together.
Dry Ingredients

Add vegetable stock to dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix well until evenly distributed.
Dry Ingredients With Vegetable Stock

Add ingredients from mixing bowl to whipped shortening. Again, whip it until smooth and creamy (3-4 minutes). And yes, again, whip it good!
Whipped Masa (Dough)

In the interim, place shredded cheese, diced chilies, and salsa verde into a medium mixing bowl and fold together until completely mixed.
NOTE: Believe it or not, now the real work begins! Gather your minions, if you can … or pop open the beverage of your choice and get ready to roll.
Cheese, Chilies, and Salsa Verde

Place one of the large Hoja (husks) on a flat surface and spoon about 2 tablespoons of the masa (dough) onto it. Now, this is where some tamale veterans may cringe, but I have found that this next step makes things go much faster and smoother. Take a small piece of plastic wrap and place it over the masa. With your hand, smooth and spread the masa out evenly, leaving several inches from the bottom of the husk, a couple inches from the top and far edge, and less than an inch from the near edge. The masa layer should be about 1/4″ thick. Remove the plastic wrap and set aside to use again. Then, scoop about 2 tablespoons of the relleno (filling) into the center of the masa.
HINT: If your Hoja are on the smaller side, just overlap two of them by a few inches to make one big leaf. Use a rubber spatula to spread a little masa on the near edge of the bottom husk to act as “glue”.
Making Tamales: Steps 1, 2, and 3

This is where a history of being a Rastafarian, or a teenager in the 1960’s, comes in handy. Take the near side of the Hoja and fold it over the the far edge. With your fingertips, lightly press the edges of the masa down to seal in the relleno. Then, while holding down the far edge of the husk, push down and draw back the near edge of the husk an inch or two so that the filling forms a sealed tube, of sorts. Now, fold up the bottom (narrow) end of the Hoja, making sure it is snug up to the bottom of the filling. Finally, roll the entire thing away from you, over the remaining flap, and …
Making Tamales: Steps 4, 5, and 6

… BOOM! You have a tamale!! Most folks say tying up the open end of your tamale is optional. But, with cheese tamales, the relleno has a tendency to bubble out, especially if you haven’t sealed in the masa well on the top end. Tying them up with a strip of Hoja not only solves that problem, but it also make them look better!
Finished Tamales

Once you have formed all of your tamales, fill the bottom of a large steamer pot with water, place the steam insert into the bottom, and cover it with several Hoja leaves. Stack the finished tamales standing up in the steamer. Bring the water to a boil and cover the steamer, allowing the tamales to steam for about 30-35 minutes.
HINT: You’ll notice that the one tamale I didn’t tie up leaked out the top. Which is why I strongly urge you to give them the “50 Shades Of Grey” treatment.
Steamer, Raw Tamales, and Steamed Tamales

When you think they are done, remove one to test. When it has cooled sufficiently, unwrap it and enjoy. If it has steamed sufficiently, remove the rest from the steamer. Serve with avocado, guacamole, pico de gallo, salsa, rice and beans … you name it! These also freeze very well for future use. Just re-steam them or nuke ’em in the microwave, once they have defrosted.
Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

For those of you who are dedicated carnivores, don’t worry. I’ll be posting up the carne (meat) version of these tasty bundles very soon!

Prep Time = 60 minutes
Cooking Time = 30-35 minutes
Makes 22-24 Tamales

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Christmas, Holidays, Latin, Main Course, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

From our family …

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 23, 2014

… to you and yours, a wish for the very best this Holiday season, and always!
2014 Holiday Card

©2014 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Christmas, Hanukkah, Holidays, New Year's | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

REVIEW: Broil King Baron 440 Grill

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 12, 2014

Broil King Baron 440When my Char-Broil Commercial Series stainless steel grill imploded (literally) after just three years of service (yes, I kept it covered), I decided it was time to step up to a better outdoor cooking station. Yet, at the same time, I wasn’t willing to pony up for the 4-figure price tag of the Webers and other premium grills. My other prerequisites were that it had 4 burners and a side burner.

As usual, I did some hardcore research, both, online and in person and found that the old adage, “They don’t make ’em like they used to” really held true. Especially, in the low to mid price range. The hoods were light and flimsy, the burners made of cheap Chinese aluminum, and the casting of the fire boxes was shoddy, at best. No wonder most grills don’t make it through more than a few seasons of use anymore.

Then, I stumbled upon the Broil King line while walking through my local Lowe’s store. After feeling the made in the USA and Canada quality, and later discovering that Broil King was made by the same company that has been the sole Weber distributer north of the border since 1986 and producer of the renowned Broil-Mate line since 1989, I decided to take the plunge on their Broil King Baron 440. In fact, my first thought was that it looked like a Weber on steroids … more on that shortly.

Putting together a Broil King Baron 440Being a hands-on type of Neanderthal, I opted to save the $50 offer for store assembly and put it together myself. I unpacked the box and followed the easy directions. Although, the instructions stated it was a two-person job, I found it to be quite easy flying solo – EXCEPT when mounting the cast iron firebox onto the cart frame! That really needs a second person to do it properly, safely, and without damaging your new grill. Total assembly time was 2 hours. Though, an added pair of Cavehands for the entire process would have reduced that a bit.

Features of Broil King Baron 440By putting it together, I really got to appreciate some of the features and appointments of this bad boy. The recessed 10,000 BTU side-burner, which closes flush with the shelf giving you added workspace when not in use, comes near flush when open allowing for the use of bigger pots and pans than other grills can fit. The thermometer, which in my tests was very accurate, is large and ergonomically embedded into the Broil King logo. The locking casters also come with adjustable leveling feet, which is great for uneven surfaces under the grill. All the components of the Baron 440 fit and sit well, coming together flush, to give it a rock solid appearance and feel.

Appointments of the Broil King Baron 440The hood has that Weber-like high profile giving you extra headroom for things like Beer Can Chicken and Standing Rib Roasts. Both, the burner shelf and the side shelf fold down making storage and transportation a breeze. The knobs are large and smooth for ease of operation, and the handles are all over-sized and strong for years of trouble free service. With the 40,000 BTU stainless steel Dual-Tube burner system, Stainless steel Flav-R-Wave cooking system (which reduces flare-ups very well), and Sure-Lite electronic ignition system (which can light any or all of the four burners), I feel like the innards of this grill won’t implode any time soon. Plus, with the stunning mix of black porcelain enamel on the hood; black powder coat on the doors; and stainless steel on the shelves, front panel, and hood/shelf bolts; the Baron 440 is pretty easy on the eyes.

Food Cooking on the Broil King Baron 440I know what you’re saying, “Cave, it sounds great. But, how does that baby cook?!?!?”. In a word, amazing! After seasoning the heavy duty cast iron grates as suggested, I threw on some Poppa Mike’s Legendary Gnarly Burgers for the first go. I figured, if I was going to mess anything up, it might as well be on a burger instead of a steak. Though, the grill performed flawlessly – firing right up, heating up quickly, and squelching any of the flare ups you can often get with ground meat. By the way, the burgers came out perfectly, as did the caramelized onions I did on the side burner. The next time out, I went for a dish that called for a little more finesse from the Baron 440 … some Cedar Plank Teriockeye Salmon. Again, the grill worked phenomenally well, cooking the fish to moist juicy excellence, and the rice pilaf on the side burner was done just right. When it was time for a Steak ala Cave and baked potato dinner, the Broil King heated up to 650° in short order, seared the sirloins flawlessly, and baked the spuds to perfection on the porcelain coated warming rack. I’ve since done everything from Tri-Tip to BBQ Chicken and Ribs (all done with indirect heat, and a cast iron smoker box I added), and Kabobs to Galbi (requiring consistent, even heat across the cooking surface), and I can honestly say that this grill does it all and makes outdoor cooking a true pleasure.

Available in both Natural Gas and LP versions. With 664 square inches of cooking area (444 sq. in. primary area) you have plenty of room to cook for friends and/or extended family. Or, if you have a more intimate meal planned, you can light just one or two of the burners and get your groove on. Throw in the Lifetime Warranty on the cast aluminium components, 5 Year Warranty on the burner system, and 2 Year Warranty on all remaining parts and paint, you have a grilling machine you’ll be able to depend on for years to come. I highly recommend the Broil King Baron 440 Grill.

MSRP – $599, seen online as low as $449

Cave Club Rating: 5 Clubs
Cave ClubCave ClubCave ClubCave ClubCave Club

Cave Club Scale
5 Clubs = The Missing Link
4 Clubs = Rock Solid
3 Clubs = Better Than Sharp Stick
2 Clubs = Not Fully Evolved
1 Club = Should Be Extinct

©2014 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This review originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

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Cave Cakes

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 18, 2014

Cave Cakes
One of the breakfast faves in the Cavehold are these scrumptious island-style pancakes. Moist, fluffy, flavorful flapjacks that forgo traditional butter for the Hawaiian Lilikoi (Passionfruit) version to create a tropical twist on this mainland morning staple. Yes … you can substitute regular butter, if you must. But, what’s the fun in that? ;)

INGREDIENTS

2 Cups White Flour
3 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1 Tablespoon Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
1 Cup PLUS 3 Tablespoons Milk
1/3 Cup Apple Juice
3 Tablespoons Lilikoi (Passionfruit) Butter – Softened
1 Large Egg – Beaten
1 Teaspoon Pure Vanilla

Optional:
Macadamia Nuts, Sliced Bananas, Pineapple Chunks, Blueberries, Sliced Strawberries, or any combination thereof

RECIPE

In a large bowl, place together flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Whisk together all the dry ingredients very well.
Whisk together dry ingredients

Next, add milk, apple juice (you can substitute peach, mango or passion fruit juice, if you’d like), egg, vanilla, and lastly the Lilikoi butter.
NOTE: Make sure the Lilikoi butter is not too hot, or it will begin to cook the egg.
Add all wet ingredients

Immediately, whisk together all ingredients well until the batter has the consistency of molasses. If the batter is too thick add milk, one tablespoon at a time, until desired consistency is achieved. Do not over mix the batter … it’s okay if there are some small chunks in there. Over mixing will result in flat, tough pancakes.
NOTE: At this point, if desired, gently fold in any of the optional ingredients listed above.
Cave Cakes batter

Pour 1/3 cup scoops of the batter onto a medium-flame heated, lightly buttered, griddle or pan.
Cave Cake batter on griddle

Cook until bubbles appear all over the pancake. Flip with a spatula. Pancakes should be golden brown. When other side turns a similar color, remove from griddle/pan.
Cave Cakes cooking

Plate with sliced fruit, eggs, bacon, or just let ’em fly solo. Top with a pat of butter and some pure Maple syrup. YUMMMMMMMMMMMMM!
Cave Cakes

Sooooooo … who wants pancakes?!?!?

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cooking Time = 3 minutes each
Makes 12-14 cakes

©2014 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

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Cavey’s Spicy Dill Pickles

Posted by Caveman Cooking on May 7, 2014

Cavey's Spicy Dill Pickles
Everybody in the Cavehold loves a good pickle. Problem is, most store bought jarred pickles aren’t that good, and making trips to the local deli several times a week can get a bit cost prohibitive. So, we went to work and came up with this easy recipe that many are describing as the best pickle they’ve ever eaten. Give ’em a try, and let us know your thoughts.

INGREDIENTS

4 Large Cucumbers
4 Serrano or Jalapeño Peppers
4 Garlic Cloves
1 Ounce Fresh Dill
4 Cups White Vinegar
4 Cups Water
2 Tbsp. Pickling Spice
1/4 Cup Pickling or Kosher Salt
4 24-Ounce Canning Jars

Optional:
1/4 White or Sweet Onion – Sliced
1/2 Red Bell Pepper – Sliced
1 Large Carrot – Sliced

RECIPE

First, sterilize your canning jars and lids. A run through the dishwasher, with the “Hot Water Heat” and “Hot Air Drying” settings turned on, will do the trick.
HINT: You can use traditional canning jars and lids. Or, as we do in the Cavehold, save the jars and lids from store bought pickles, olives, relish, etc.
Place vinegar, water, salt, and pickling spice into a medium-large pot and bring to a soft boil for 10-15 minutes.
Boiling water, vinegar, and spices

While liquid is heating, rinse cucumbers well in cold water and slice each cucumber in half, crosswise. Then, again in half, lengthwise. From each remaining section, slice into three equal sized spears, lengthwise. You should get 12 spears per cucumber.
Slicing cucumbers

Slice hot peppers and garlic cloves in half. Cut any of the optional vegetables into 2 inch slices.
NOTE: While the “optional” ingredients aren’t required, the more you put in the more the flavor complexity of the pickles increases.
HINT: If you don’t want your pickles to have an edge, don’t add the Serrano or Jalapeño peppers. Though, you really should try them in at least one jar … they don’t add that much heat, but do add a ton of flavor.
Slicing peppers and garlic

Now, place 1/4 of the fresh dill into each jar. Follow that with 12 cucumber spears, 2 slices of the hot peppers, 2 slices of the garlic, and a 1/4 of the optional ingredients into each jar.
Stuffing the jars

Once the brining liquid has fully cooked, place a jar into the sink. Using an oven mitt, remove the boiling liquid from the flame, and completely fill the jar with the liquid, being sure that 1/4 of the pickling spices also make it in.
Pouring brine into jar

Return the pot to the flame and, with oven mitts on, carefully place the lid on the jar and tighten firmly as possible. Repeat this process with each jar, being sure to return the pot to the fire (mmmmmmmmm …. fire gooooood!) between each pour. Place finished jars onto the counter and allow to cool for 15-20 minutes.
Finished jars of pickles

Once cooled to the touch, place the jars into the refrigerator and forget about them for two weeks. It will be tempting to pop open a jar and give ’em a go once they’ve chilled. But, they need the time to “pickle”, of course! They’ll last up to 4 months in the fridge. DO NOT store them in the pantry …. you gotta keep ’em cold. Enjoy!
HINT: The other veggies (except for the dill) are now pickled, and delicious, as well. Yes, even the garlic!
Cavey's Spicy Dill Pickles

Prep Time = 40 minutes
Curing Time = 2 Weeks
Makes 4 Jars

©2014 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Side Dishes, Vegetables, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Homegrown Lunch

Posted by Caveman Cooking on March 3, 2014

BLTT (Bacon Lettuce Tomato & Turkey) with homegrown tomato and lettuce. YUMMMMMMM!
(Can’t see it on the backside, but there’s a homemade spicy dill pickle on the plate, too!)

BLTT

©2014 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Sandwiches | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

C3TV: Garlic Mashed Taters

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 27, 2013


On this episode, we’ve got a simple but scrumptious side dish that goes equally well with an everyday meal as it does with a Holiday feast. Our famous Garlic Mashed Taters! A simple, yet yummy mashed potato recipe that’s sure to get your taste buds dancing and your guests singing your culinary praises.

Episode 202

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in C3TV, Side Dishes, Thanksgiving | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

From The Cave Clan …

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 24, 2013

… to you and yours, a wish for a healthy, happy, and rockin’ Holiday Season!
2013 Holiday Card

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Christmas, Hanukkah, Holidays, New Year's | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

C3TV: Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 20, 2013


This dish is so simple to make, yet it will make you look like you’re a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu! In fact it is so quick and easy, you can make a mid-week meal feel as if it was a special occasion!! This recipe is bursting with flavor, and sure to become one of your clan’s favorites. You can also give it a whirl with some thick-cut Boneless Pork Loin in place of the chicken, if you’d prefer.

Episode 201

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in C3TV, Main Course | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 15, 2013

C3TV - Watch This RecipeSuper Stuffed Chicken Breasts
I can’t believe that I haven’t posted this recipe yet! We have been enjoying it for several years around the Cavehold. Plus, it is about to make an appearance on a new episode of C3TV. So, I figured I’d better get it up on here, PRONTO! Enjoy!!

INGREDIENTS

4 Skinless, Boneless Chicken Breasts
8 Fresh Basil Leaves
4 Slices Semi-Soft Cheese
4 Heaping Teaspoons Pine Nuts
3 Garlic Cloves – Minced
Salt & Pepper to taste

RECIPE

Rinse basil leaves, and pat dry. Toast pine nuts until lightly golden (add a pinch of salt, if desired).
Rinsed Basil and Toasted Pine Nuts

Mince garlic, and slice cheese.
NOTE: While just about any semi-soft cheese will work well, smoked Gouda is a very good choice for this dish. If you want to take it up several rungs on the evolution scale, try some aged Cougar Gold White Cheddar from the Washington State University Creamery.
Minced Garlic and Sliced Cheese

With a sharp knife, cut a pocket into the chicken breasts … taking care not to slice all the way through. Stuff each breast with one slice of cheese, two basil leaves, 1/2 teaspoon of garlic, and a teaspoon of pine nuts. Then, with a turkey lacer, seal up the hole (sometimes, it takes two lacers).
HINT: You can substitute the chicken for some thick-cut boneless Pork Loin. That’s all about the YUM!
Slicing Pocket, Stuffing Breast, and Sealing Hole.

Place finished breasts onto a greased cookie sheet and sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste. Place into a 400° preheated oven for 35-40 minutes.
Salt and Pepper To Taste

When finished, remove from oven and, with a couple of forks, remove turkey lacers.
Finished Stuffed Chicken Breasts

That’s all folks! Serve them alongside some rice pilaf or Garlic Mashed Taters and some Sautéed Veggies and you’ll be eating like a King … while only putting in the effort of a Neanderthal!!
Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cook Time = 40 minutes
Serves 4

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Main Course | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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