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Archive for the ‘Appetizers’ Category

Cavey’s Colossal Shrimp Cocktail

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 30, 2015

Cavey’s Colossal Shrimp Cocktail
With the New Year’s Eve celebrations set for tomorrow, I thought I’d share one of the favorite appetizers we will enjoy in the Cavehold as we ring in 2016. In fact, we bring this one out just about anytime we are celebrating anything. Take a bite of one of these plump, succulent, delicious decapod crustaceans and you’ll be adding this shrimp cocktail recipe to your next fete’s menu, too! Best of all, the recipe is SO easy … just the way I like ’em!!

INGREDIENTS

2 Pounds Of Jumbo Black Tiger Prawns – shell on, deveined
4 Quarts Cold Water
2 Tablespoons World Spice Merchants “Classic Crab”
1 Tablespoon Whole Black Peppercorns
1 Preparation of Cave’s Quick Cocktail Sauce
OPTIONAL: Replace 1 cup of the water with a can of your favorite beer

RECIPE

Place shrimp in large colander and quickly rinse with cool water and drain. If frozen, DO NOT defrost.
NOTE: I prefer the “U-12” Black Tiger Shrimp found at Costco. They are already deveined, yet still have the shells on … plus, they are so tasty! That said, any uncooked colossal shrimp (12-14 per pound) should work just fine.
Uncooked Tiger Shrimp

Fill large stock pot with water (add beer, if so inclined), World Spice Merchants “Classic Crab” spice blend, and peppercorns. Bring to a boil, then let simmer for 10 minutes. Return to boil and add shrimp. Reduce flame and cook until prawns are pink and opaque throughout (about 5-8 minutes if frozen, 3-5 minutes if not) – shrimp will usually float when done.
NOTE: You can substitute the World Spice Merchants Classic Crab with Old Bay Seasoning or other seafood-boil spices. Though, I would recommend adding a Bay Leaf, mustard seed, and other spices/herbs to make up for the difference in flavor.
Cooking Shrimp

When done, immediately strain shrimp in a large colander. Then quickly place prawns into an ice bath until fully cooled. Again, quickly strain shrimp well.
NOTE: It is important not to let the shrimp sit in the cooling water too long. They can absorb water like a sponge, ruining their taste and texture.
HINT: We like to reserve the cooking broth as it makes a great base for seafood soups, cioppino, etc. Just let it cool, put it into a container, and freeze it until ready for use.
Strain, Cool, and Strain Shrimp

Next, shell the shrimp. If you do it right, you can take off the the shells and remove the legs in one motion, as displayed below. I also like to leave the tail and last section of shell on. Not only does it give the dish a stylish presentation, but acts as a little handle for you and your guests to use when eating it.
Peeling Shrimp Cocktail

You can either serve them immediately or refrigerate them for up to 3 days. When ready, just plate them on a large ice-filled platter with a small ramekin of Cave’s Quick Cocktail Sauce in the center. Have another empty ramekin nearby for the discarded tails. Now just dip and enjoy! And, most importantly, have a happy, healthy, and happening New Year!
Cavey’s Colossal Shrimp Cocktail

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cooking Time = 2-6 minutes
Serves 6-12

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Holidays, New Year's, Seafood | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Killer Chili Rojo (Red Pork) Tamales

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 4, 2015

Killer Chili Rojo (Red Pork) Tamales
I gave you my Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamale recipe a few months back. Though, I probably should have posted it’s carnivore counterpart sooner, I felt, with Christmas right around the corner, now would be a perfect time to share it. While this remains a labor intensive recipe, it really is a very easy dish to pull off. Besides, if you gather your masses together for an assembly line when it comes time to actually fill and roll the tamales, it goes by very quickly. When you finally unwrap one and take a bite, you’ll forget about all the steps involved!

INGREDIENTS

Chili Rojo (Meat Filling):
1 Preparation of Chili Rojo Rub
2.5 Pounds Pork Butt (Shoulder) Roast
1/2 Red Onion
5 Cloves Garlic – Smashed
1 Teaspoon Kosher or Sea Salt
1 1/4 Cups Red Chili Sauce
1 1/4 Cup Chili Rojo Stock – Reserved

Masa (Dough):
5 Cups Tamal (Instant Masa Mix)
4 1/2 Cups Vegetable Stock
1/2 Cup Chili Rojo Stock – Reserved
2 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1.5 Teaspoon Salt
2 1/8 Cups Vegetable Shortening
1 1/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

1 Package Hoja (Dried Corn Husks)

RECIPE

Follow the instructions for one preparation of Chili Rojo Rub.
Chili Rojo Rub

Cover pork butt roast liberally with the rub. Cover tightly with plastic wrap, place on a plate, and refrigerate overnight.
Pork Butt Roast Covered With Chili Rojo Rub

The next day, remove the roast from the refrigerator 15-20 minutes before you are ready to start cooking. Slice onion into quarters. Peel and smash garlic cloves.
Quartered Onion & Smashed Garlic

Place pork roast into a stock pot. Cover with water by 2-3 inches. Add onion, garlic, and salt. Bring to a boil. Then, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 2.5 hours, until fall-apart tender.
Pork Roast In Stock Pot

When done, remove the pork roast from the stock pot and place onto a large platter. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes, then shred meat with two forks or, if you have them, meat claws. Be sure to separate the meat from the fat, and discard the latter.
Shredded Chili Rojo

Reserve 1 3/4 of the meat stock (1 1/4 for the meat, 1/2 for the masa) and set aside.
Reserving Meat Stock

Place the shredded meat into a large sauce pot, add Red Chili Sauce and reserved meat stock, and heat uncovered over a low flame for 20 minutes. Stir often.
NOTE: You’ll likely have some left over meat filling. Don’t sweat it, it makes for a great version of Carnitas!
Saucing & Reheating Meat Filling

Cover the Hoja (corn husks) with cool water for at least 40 minutes. When thoroughly soaked, squeeze excess water out then place into a colander to allow rest of excess water to drip out. Do not let the husks dry completely – they must be moist and pliable when wrapping the tamales.
HINT: Place a heavy plate on top of the husks so that they stay completely submerged.
Soaking The Hoja (Corn Husks)

While the meat filling is simmering and the Hojas soaking, make your Masa (dough). Place shortening into mixer and whip it until silky (3-4 minutes). Yes, Devo fans. I said, whip it. Whip it good!
Whipped Shortening

Meanwhile, place all the dry ingredients (Tamal, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together.
Dry Ingredients

Add vegetable stock and meat stock to dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix well until evenly distributed.
Dry Ingredients With Vegetable Stock

Add ingredients from mixing bowl to whipped shortening. Again, whip it until smooth and creamy (3-4 minutes). And yes, again, whip it good!
Whipped Masa (Dough)

Now’s the time to gather the clan and press them into service. Pop open a cold one, put on some good tunes, and make a party of it!
Place one of the large Hoja (husks) on a flat surface and spoon about 2 tablespoons of the masa (dough) onto it. Now, this is where some tamale veterans may cringe, but I have found that this next step makes things go much faster and smoother. Take a small piece of plastic wrap and place it over the masa. With your hand, smooth and spread the masa out evenly, leaving several inches from the bottom of the husk, a couple inches from the top and far edge, and less than an inch from the near edge. The masa layer should be about 1/4″ thick. Remove the plastic wrap and set aside to use again. Then, scoop about 2 tablespoons of the Chili Rojo (meat filling) into the center of the masa.
HINT: If your Hoja are on the smaller side, just overlap two of them by a few inches to make one big leaf. Use a rubber spatula to spread a little masa on the near edge of the bottom husk to act as “glue”.
Making Tamales: Steps 1, 2, and 3

This is where a history of being a Hippie or Rastafarian, comes in handy. Take the near side of the Hoja and fold it over the the far edge. With your fingertips, lightly press the edges of the masa down to seal in the meat. Then, while holding down the far edge of the husk, push down and draw back the near edge of the husk an inch or two so that the masa forms a sealed tube, of sorts. Now, fold up the bottom (narrow) end of the Hoja, making sure it is snug up to the bottom of the filling. Finally, roll the entire thing away from you, over the remaining flap, and …
Making Tamales: Steps 4, 5, and 6

… KaBOOOOOOOM! You have a tamale!! Most folks say tying up the open end of your tamale is optional. But, tying them up with a strip of Hoja keeps all the ingredients inside, and also helps make them look better when done.
Finished Tamales

Once you have formed all of your tamales, fill the bottom of a large steamer pot with water, place the steam insert into the bottom, and cover it with several Hoja leaves. Stack the finished tamales standing up in the steamer. Bring the water to a boil and cover the steamer, allowing the tamales to steam for about 30 minutes.
HINT: You’ll notice that the one tamale I didn’t tie up leaked out the top. Which is why I strongly urge you to give them the “50 Shades Of Grey” treatment.
Steamer, Raw Tamales, and Steamed Tamales

When you think they are done, remove one to test. When it has cooled sufficiently, unwrap it and enjoy. If it has steamed sufficiently, remove the rest from the steamer. Serve with avocado, guacamole, pico de gallo, salsa, rice and beans … you name it! These also freeze very well for future use. Just re-steam them or nuke ’em in the microwave, once they have defrosted.
Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

Give these a try … you won’t be disappointed. I’ve had several Hispanic friends swear me to secrecy that they actually liked these better than their Mom’s. Don’t worry, amigos … I’m not naming names! 😉

Marinate Time = 24 Hours
Prep Time = 90 minutes
Cooking Time = 3 Hours
Makes 28-32 Tamales

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Christmas, Holidays, Latin, Main Course, Side Dishes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

Posted by Caveman Cooking on May 14, 2015

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales
While this is a labor intensive recipe, and I’m all about the easy, it isn’t a very difficult dish to pull off. Besides, if you gather the whole Caveclan together for an assembly line when it comes time to actually fill and roll the tamales, it goes by very quickly. Plus, when you finally unwrap one and take a bite, you’ll forget about all the steps involved!

INGREDIENTS

Masa (Dough):
3 Cups Tamal (Instant Masa Mix)
3 Cups Vegetable Stock
1 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1 Teaspoon Salt
1 1/3 Cups Vegetable Shortening
3/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

Relleno (Filling):
10 Ounces Mexican Melting Cheese – Shredded (I prefer Manchego or Oaxaca; can substitute Jack)
1/2 Cup Canned Chilies – Diced
1/2 Cup Salsa Verde

1 Package Hoja (Dried Corn Husks)

RECIPE

Cover the Hoja (corn husks) with cool water for 30-40 minutes. When thoroughly soaked, squeeze excess water out then place into a colander to allow rest of excess water to drip out. Do not let the husks dry completely – they must be moist and pliable when wrapping the tamales.
HINT: Place a heavy plate on top of the husks so that they stay completely submerged.
Soaking The Hoja (Corn Husks)

Place shortening into mixer and whip it until silky (3-4 minutes). Yes, Devo fans. I said, whip it. Whip it good!
Whipped Shortening

Meanwhile, place all the dry ingredients (Tamal, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together.
Dry Ingredients

Add vegetable stock to dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix well until evenly distributed.
Dry Ingredients With Vegetable Stock

Add ingredients from mixing bowl to whipped shortening. Again, whip it until smooth and creamy (3-4 minutes). And yes, again, whip it good!
Whipped Masa (Dough)

In the interim, place shredded cheese, diced chilies, and salsa verde into a medium mixing bowl and fold together until completely mixed.
NOTE: Believe it or not, now the real work begins! Gather your minions, if you can … or pop open the beverage of your choice and get ready to roll.
Cheese, Chilies, and Salsa Verde

Place one of the large Hoja (husks) on a flat surface and spoon about 2 tablespoons of the masa (dough) onto it. Now, this is where some tamale veterans may cringe, but I have found that this next step makes things go much faster and smoother. Take a small piece of plastic wrap and place it over the masa. With your hand, smooth and spread the masa out evenly, leaving several inches from the bottom of the husk, a couple inches from the top and far edge, and less than an inch from the near edge. The masa layer should be about 1/4″ thick. Remove the plastic wrap and set aside to use again. Then, scoop about 2 tablespoons of the relleno (filling) into the center of the masa.
HINT: If your Hoja are on the smaller side, just overlap two of them by a few inches to make one big leaf. Use a rubber spatula to spread a little masa on the near edge of the bottom husk to act as “glue”.
Making Tamales: Steps 1, 2, and 3

This is where a history of being a Rastafarian, or a teenager in the 1960’s, comes in handy. Take the near side of the Hoja and fold it over the the far edge. With your fingertips, lightly press the edges of the masa down to seal in the relleno. Then, while holding down the far edge of the husk, push down and draw back the near edge of the husk an inch or two so that the filling forms a sealed tube, of sorts. Now, fold up the bottom (narrow) end of the Hoja, making sure it is snug up to the bottom of the filling. Finally, roll the entire thing away from you, over the remaining flap, and …
Making Tamales: Steps 4, 5, and 6

… BOOM! You have a tamale!! Most folks say tying up the open end of your tamale is optional. But, with cheese tamales, the relleno has a tendency to bubble out, especially if you haven’t sealed in the masa well on the top end. Tying them up with a strip of Hoja not only solves that problem, but it also make them look better!
Finished Tamales

Once you have formed all of your tamales, fill the bottom of a large steamer pot with water, place the steam insert into the bottom, and cover it with several Hoja leaves. Stack the finished tamales standing up in the steamer. Bring the water to a boil and cover the steamer, allowing the tamales to steam for about 30-35 minutes.
HINT: You’ll notice that the one tamale I didn’t tie up leaked out the top. Which is why I strongly urge you to give them the “50 Shades Of Grey” treatment.
Steamer, Raw Tamales, and Steamed Tamales

When you think they are done, remove one to test. When it has cooled sufficiently, unwrap it and enjoy. If it has steamed sufficiently, remove the rest from the steamer. Serve with avocado, guacamole, pico de gallo, salsa, rice and beans … you name it! These also freeze very well for future use. Just re-steam them or nuke ’em in the microwave, once they have defrosted.
Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

For those of you who are dedicated carnivores, don’t worry. I’ve posted the carne (meat) version of these tasty bundles right here!

Prep Time = 90 minutes
Cooking Time = 30-35 minutes
Makes 22-24 Tamales

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Christmas, Holidays, Latin, Main Course, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Cavey’s Crab Dip

Posted by Caveman Cooking on July 4, 2011

Cavey's Crab Dip
So, I’m doing some shopping for the stuff we need for our 4th of July feast when I bump into a fellow Neanderthal at the meat counter.  As I get my mitts on a container of real crabmeat from the refrigerated case, he asks me, “What are you gonna do with that?”
I reply, “Make some crab dip! ”
To which he says, “Mmmmmmm.  Sounds good!  Is the recipe on your website?”
That’s the moment I realized that one of the easiest and yummiest dishes I do has never made an appearance on this rag.  Three ingredients and three minutes is all it takes to make an appetizing appetizer perfect for any summertime fete.

INGREDIENTS

24 Ounces Sour Cream
1 1.8 Ounce Package Knorr Leek Soup Mix
8 Ounces Real Crabmeat

NOTE: This recipe can be made with regular onion soup mix and canned crabmeat. However, I highly recommend using Knorr Leek Soup and the real crabmeat found in the refrigerated section of your local supermarket (usually near the meat department). Costco also carries a great lump crabmeat in their refrigerated section. Additionally, though it doesn’t really make this a “healthy dish”, using the “Light” version of sour cream certainly cuts down on the caloric and fat content for those trying to watch their Caveish figure.
 Cavey's Crab Dip Ingredients

Place sour cream and soup mix into medium sized mixing bowl and stir until fully blended.
Sour Cream & Knorr Leek Soup Mix

Now, place crabmeat into bowl and gently fold into sour cream/soup mixture.
HINT: I like to have small lumps of crabmeat in my dip. If you prefer it a little smoother, go ahead and add the crab meat when you initially put in the soup mix. The extra stirring will smooth it out.
Adding Crabmeat

Cover mixture and refrigerate for at least three hours … and that’s it! Just serve with your favorite dipping chip and be ready for the YUM!!
HAPPY 4TH OF JULY!!!
Cavey's Crab Dip

Prep Time = 3 Minutes
Chill Time = 3 Hours
Serves 10-20

©2011 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Seafood | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Cure For The Common Salmon

Posted by Caveman Cooking on September 6, 2010

Cure For The Common Salmon 7
The family emergency continues, making it difficult for me to post as often as usual. But, I’ve got another one here that will knock your loincloth off! Some call this Lox, Gravlox, or (mistakenly) Smoked Salmon. Though, it is really Cured Salmon … and, it is really good! Simple, too!!

INGREDIENTS

1 2-3 Pound Fillet Fresh Salmon, skinned
1 Cup Sea or Kosher Salt
1/2 Cup White Granulated Sugar
1/2 Cup Brown Sugar
2 Tablespoons Fresh Ground Peppercorns
1 Bunch Fresh Dill

RECIPE

In a medium bowl, place salt, sugars, and pepper. Whisk together until fully blended and the brown sugar is no longer clumpy.
HINT #1: I used a five-flavor blend of peppercorns that included white, black, green and pink peppercorns and Jamaican pepper. Though, using plain old fresh ground black pepper will work just fine, too.
Cure For The Common Salmon 1

Place the salmon fillet centered on a piece of plastic wrap that is more than twice the length of the fillet itself. Cover the fillet with half the salt mixture, and then half the dill bunch.
Cure For The Common Salmon 2

Carefully turn the fillet over (It helps to pat down the ingredients into the fillet first). Then, cover the other side of the salmon with the rest of the salt mixture and dill.
Now, wrap the salmon as tightly as possible with the plastic wrap.
Place wrapped filet onto a sufficiently large plate or platter to catch any juices that my run off during the curing process. Place into refrigerator for 24 hours, making sure to turn it over at the halfway point.
HINT #2: If you wrap it tight enough, you won’t have to stack any blocks or anything else that other recipes seem to call for. I also like to re-wrap the fillet with a second piece of plastic wrap to help achieve the necessary tautness.
Cure For The Common Salmon 3

After 24 hours, remove the fillet from the fridge and carefully unwrap it. This is what it should look like!
Cure For The Common Salmon 4

Remove the dill and as much of the salt mixture as possible. Under cold running water, rinse the rest of the dill and salt from the salmon. Pat it dry with a paper towel.
Cure For The Common Salmon 5

With a very sharp knife cut the fillet, on an angle, into very thin slices. Layer the each slice on top of the previous one.
Now, you need to make a decision. Eat it right away? Refrigerate it until later? Or, freeze it for future use in the next 2-3 months? It’s hard not to try some right away, so go ahead and have at it. But, I like to wrap it up in some fresh plastic wrap and refrigerate it another 24 hours … it just seems to give it an extra bit of flavor curing.
Cure For The Common Salmon 6

When you are ready to serve it, you can place it on toast triangles with a little Goat Cheese and capers, put it in a salad, or go the traditional route pictured here: with a bagel, cream cheese, and slice tomatoes and onions.
HINT #3: You can add many other ingredients during the curing process. Paper thin slices of lemon; zest of any citrus; fresh tarragon or parsley; fennel, caraway, or coriander seeds; or just about anything else you may want to experiment with. Be creative and have fun!
Cure For The Common Salmon 7

Prep Time = 15 minutes
Cure Time = 24 Hours
Serves 6-8

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Breakfast, Seafood | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Teriockeye Salmon Wontons

Posted by Caveman Cooking on July 28, 2010

Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 6
Being that this is now the third wonton recipe I am sharing here, it is readily apparent that the Caveclan loves their deep-fried Asian appetizers. That said, these just may be the best of the bunch! All I know is that I’ve made them several times now and they have all disappeared quicker than one of Lindsey Lohan’s lawyers. 😉

INGREDIENTS

1/3 Pound Fresh Sockeye Salmon Filet
3 Tablespoons Teriyaki Sauce
4 Ounces Cream Cheese (NOT whipped)
4 Water Chestnuts
1 Green Onion
2 Tablespoons Corn Starch
24 Wonton Wrappers

RECIPE

Skin Salmon, then cut into 1″ rectangles. Place into bowl and cover with Teriyaki sauce. Be sure to get all the pieces of fish evenly and completely soaked in the sauce. Set aside.
HINT #1: While any type of Salmon would work for this recipe, I highly recommend Sockeye Salmon. Aside from the fact that it is part of the name of this dish, it is also the most flavorful type of the anadromous Salmonidae.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 1

While the fish is soaking, mince onions and water chestnuts, cut cream cheese into 1/4″ cubes (about 1/3 of a teaspoon), and set up your wonton making station. You’ll need the above ingredients plus a small bowl with cool water, a clean plate, a cooking towel, and a cookie sheet completely dusted with the corn starch.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 2

Place a wonton wrapper on the plate, add a cube of cream cheese, a piece of Salmon, and a pinch each of green onion and water chestnut.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 3

NOTE: Previously, I showed you how to make a “Bishop’s Hat” wonton. This time, I’ll demonstrate the “Pirate’s Hat”.
Wet your finger and moisten three edges of the wonton wrapper. Take the dry edge and fold it over to the opposite edge. With your finger tips, firmly seal all the edges, while pressing gently to remove any gaps between the filling and the wrapper itself.
HINT #2: Any air or gaps may cause a bubble to form on the wrapper surface when the wonton is cooked. These tend to pop and let the cream cheese come running out.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 4

Next, fold the front edge back slightly and firmly pinch the ends together, creating an air-tight seal. When done, place wonton onto cookie sheet and wipe any moisture off your prep plate before making your next wonton.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 5

When all wontons are made, cover the cookie sheet with plastic wrap and place into freezer for an hour before cooking them. This helps the wontons to hold their shape, as well as prevent tears in the wrapper while they are being cooked.
In a saute pan or wok, heat vegetable oil to 350°. Gently place 4 or 5 wontons into the oil and cook for about 1 minute or so (depending on oil temp). Don’t overcrowd the pan or they won’t cook evenly.
Serve with your favorite dipping sauce. Pictured here with spicy Plum Sauce.
HINT #3: If you make too many (as if that was possible), once they are frozen, remove them from the cookie sheet and place into a freezer-friendly, air-tight container. When you’re ready to eat them, just plop them straight into the oil from the freezer. They will last up to three months.
Teriockeye Salmon Wontons 6

Prep Time = 30 minutes
Cook Time = 1 Minute
Makes 24 Wontons

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Asian, Seafood | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments »

Hummus

Posted by Caveman Cooking on June 8, 2010

Hummus
Wherever you travel in the Mediterranean, from Lebanon, to Israel, to Turkey and beyond, Hummus seems to be a mainstay as a side dish and/or appetizer. For good reason … it’s gooooooooood! And so easy to make, as well. So, it only seems fitting that we wrap up our weeklong epicurean excursion to the Middle East with this Caveman’s version of a classic regional dish.

INGREDIENTS

1 16 Ounce Can of Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas)
3 Garlic Cloves
3 Tbsp Tahini Paste
3 Tbsp Fresh Lemon Juice
2 Tbsp Olive Oil
1/4 Cup Garbanzo Bean Juice
1/4 Tsp Cayenne Pepper
1/4 Tsp Salt
1 Tsp Fresh Chopped Italian Leaf Parsley

RECIPE

Drain garbanzo beans, reserving 1/4 cup of the canning juice.
Draining Garbanzo Beans

Squeeze and strain the juice from a fresh lemon until you have 3 tablespoons worth. About half a lemon usually does the trick.
HINT: Again, I can’t stress enough how using Meyer’s Lemons in these recipes makes such a huge difference. Use them if at all possible.
Juicing Lemon

Crush Garlic.
Crushing Garlic

Place all ingredients, EXCEPT PARSLEY, into food processor.
Ingredients in Food Processor

Process on high setting for about 2-3 minutes, until mixture is creamy and semi-smooth.
HINT #2: This will never get as smooth as the Tahina Sauce. So, don’t over process it trying to get it to that consistency. A very slight grainy appearance is expected.
Ingredients Processing

To properly plate when done, with a rubber spatula scoop out enough to more than cover the area of the serving plate. Smooth out the Hummus, kind of making a wheel shape out of the hummus. Be sure to leave a little round reservoir in the middle of the “wheel”.
Plating Hummus

Pour a little Olive Oil into the center reservoir. Then, dust dish with Paprika.
Plating Hummus #2

Finally, top hummus with finely chopped parsley and serve along side your favorite Mediterranean dish. Pictured here with Falafel, Pita Bread, Tahina Sauce, Caveraeli Salad, and Harif.
Hummus

We hope you’ve enjoyed our culinary journey over the past week. We’ll be adding more recipes to this regional list in the coming weeks, including my promised Falafel recipe … I still need to try one more tweek before it is ready for public consumption.

Prep Time = 15 Minutes
Cooking Time = n/a
Serves 4-6

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Middle Eastern, Rubs, Sauces, Marinades & Dressings, Side Dishes, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 34 Comments »

Super Sunday Success

Posted by Caveman Cooking on February 8, 2010

Caveman & Cavegirl Making WontonsWhat a day! A good game, great food (if I do say so myself), and a fantastic time was had by all. Actually, this Super Sunday actually started on Saturday with the making of the 2+2 Tequila Chili and the Lamb Wontons. Stews and Chilies are always better the second day, and by making and freezing the wontons ahead of time the game-day workload was greatly reduced. My personal workload was lightened even more by the assistance of the Cavegirl in the making of the wontons. I just showed her how to do it once and then she was off to the races making some perfect “Bishop’s Hats”. She was so proud today when everyone complimented her on how professional her wontons looked … and I was proud that my little girl is already showing some great culinary talent at the tender age of four.
I didn’t make any variations in the wonton recipe. Though, I did experiment a bit with the dipping sauce. I took 4 tablespoons of store-bought plum sauce and combined it with 2.5 teaspoons of apricot juice (reserved from the canned apricots I used for the baked brie described below), 1/4 teaspoon ground chili oil, 1/4 teaspoon fresh fine-grated ginger, and a few drips of chili sesame oil. Turned out to be a nice sweet and tangy sauce that flattered the the bold, rich flavor of the wontons. Almost tasted like a samosa with a sweet chutney sauce.Lamb Wontons

Speaking of the Baked Brie with Peach Sauce, I did make a few adjustments to the usual recipe. For one, instead of using peach sauce I made an apricot sauce that just may be a better compliment to the brie. So, I guess it was really a Baked Brie with Apricot Sauce. 😉 Also, instead of just some dried cherries I found a trio medley that also included dried blueberries and cranberries … definitely an improvement! For some reason, however, the oven wasn’t cooking as hot as usual. As a result, the cheese could have used another 5 minutes or so. It still was absolutely delicious … even the Cavekids were mowing on the pungent cheese.
Baked Brie with Apricot SauceUnfortunately, we had a few last minute cancellations, so our menu changed and contracted slightly. Instead of the planned Crab Dip and Crudites we switched over to some Rockin’ Guac with Garlic Parmesan Pita Chips … a little lighter than the crustacean filled creamy dip and a bit more veggie friendly for the Cavewoman. Besides, we had just gotten a new shipment of homegrown avocados from the Cave-in-laws and a couple of them were just ripe enough – using the mini food processor on them didn’t hurt either. I must say that the Fuerte variety that they grow are, by far, my favorite type of avo. They are so creamy and buttery, you just don’t want to stop eating them … which can be a problem. Rockin' Guac with Parmesan Garlic Pita Chips

The Chili is one of those recipes that is set in stone. If I messed with it, even if it worked, there would certainly be a “mutiny on the chili-bowl”. Instead of inviting an insurgency, I opted to make a second chili. A veggie version of the traditional 2+2 Tequila Chili. Unfortunately, I didn’t quite get the balance of ingredients right with the lesser amounts of veggie meat (Morningstar Crumbles), which also doesn’t impart the same flavors into the dish that the real deal does. Though, I think that with some tweeking, I can make a veggie version that will rock the herbivore crowd the way the carnivores were today. Regrettably, I didn’t take a shot of the Chili course when plated … yeah, I jelled! 😐 But, if you really need to see what it looked exactly like, see this photo.
Angel Food Cake with Nectar of the Gods FruitBefore we get to dessert, let’s talk about the game. The final score (34-17) doesn’t represent the hard-fought, see-saw battle that this Super Bowl truly was. I think the only people who weren’t happy after this game were the Colts’ fans and the much publicized guy who bet $1Million on them to win straight up (what a Du-mah!). The game had it all: a ten point turn around (only the second time in SB history), goal line stands, an “onside kick” to start the second half, and a rockin’ half-time show from The Who that had the whole stadium singing every song. Not to mention, the end result was sweet redemption for QB Drew Brees, the Saints organization, and the city and people of New Orleans. You can’t help but enjoy a show like that!
As for the much lauded Super Bowl commercials, most were ok at best. But a few caught our collective eye: Puxatawny Palamau, Snickers with Betty White & Abe Vigoda, and the VW “Punch” spot with Stevie Wonder and Tracy Morgan at the end.

Yeah, I know, I’ve ranted enough and it’s time for dessert. As usual, the Cavewoman was in charge of the sweet portion of our menu. After all the rich foods we were consuming, she went for something a little lighter: an Angel Food Cake topped with Nectar of the Gods Fruit Salad. I don’t want to give away the whole recipe since she promised to post it this week, but it was sooooooooo good with the sweetened fruit and light, airy cake combining for a perfect capper on a delicious day!

Super Bowl Crew

The best part was seeing the satiated and content smiles on everyone’s face when all was said and done. As you can see the food is all gone, Caveboy is out, the Cavegirl is on her way out, and the rest of the crew (from left, Cousin Wendy, the Cave-in-laws Peg and Leo, and the Cavewoman) was so full, they didn’t move for about an hour. Everyone truly seemed to have a great time at what will undoubtedly be our last soiree in this house. What a great way to go out! 😉
Hope your Super Sunday was as fun and flavorful!

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This post originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This post may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Main Course, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments »

Rockin’ Guac

Posted by Caveman Cooking on January 25, 2010


As promised in Freezer Food Fest #10, here is my recipe for some killer guacamole. It doesn’t hurt that I get some phenomenal homegrown avocados, courtesy of the Cave-in-laws!

INGREDIENTS

3-4 Medium Avocados, ripened
1 Medium-Large Roma Tomato
1/4 Cup Sweet Onion, minced
1 Tbsp Garlic, minced
1 Tbsp Cilantro, finely chopped
1/4 Fresh Lime
1/4 tsp World Spice Merchants Ancho Chili Powder
1/4 tsp Tapatio Sauce
Salt & Pepper to taste

RECIPE

First, make sure you enlist the help of a good sous chef. Not only do things go faster, it’s a lot more fun to cook with some one else … especially if it’s your kid!

With a sharp knife, cut avocados in half, lengthwise. Score the avocado into 1/2 inch square sections, being careful not to cut through the skin. Then use a spoon to scoop out the flesh of the avo and place into a medium-large bowl.

Chop tomato and cilantro, mince garlic and onion, and place into the bowl. Add chili powder, Tapatio Sauce, salt, and pepper, as well.
HINT #1: I like to use Garlic Salt instead of regular for this recipe.

Take a fork and begin to mix all the ingredients well. Continue until the avocado starts to smooth a bit, yet leaving some chunks, as well.

Squeeze the juice from the lime section onto mixture and mix in well.

At this point taste the guac and adjust seasonings as needed. Place into bowl and serve immediately, or cover air-tight and refrigerate until needed (not more than 4 hours for freshest flavor and color)
HINT #2: Reserve one avocado pit and place into center of completed and plated guacamole. It not only looks kind of cool, but it also helps it from turning color too soon. No one likes guac that isn’t green!

RECIPE UPDATE: Lately, I have taken to switching out the chili powder and Tapatio Sauce for a small jalapeño pepper (veined, seeded, and minced), and a 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper. It really takes this already rockin’ recipe to the next level!

Prep Time = 15 minutes
Cook Time = n/a
Serves 4-8

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Latin, Side Dishes, Vegetables, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments »

Shrimp Avocado Rolls

Posted by Caveman Cooking on January 19, 2010

Food Blogs Post of the Day for 1/19/10

This recipe won Post of the Day for 1/19/10!


Thought Shrimp Rolls were only for restaurant dining? Think again!

INGREDIENTS

8 Medium-Large Shrimp
1/2 Avocado, ripened
2 Medium Carrots
2 Medium Celery Stalks
2-3 Green Onions
2 Tbsp. Fresh Chopped Basil
4 Egg Roll Wrappers
Vegetable Oil

RECIPE

Rinse and drain shrimp. Remove tails, shells, and veins. Re-rinse and drain. Cover and refrigerate until ready for cooking.

Sliver carrots, celery and onions. Chop Basil. Slice avocado. Set aside.

Next, set up your prep station with a prep plate, another plate dusted with corn starch, a cup of water and, of course, all your ingredients.

Place egg roll wrapper on prep plate and put 1/4 of all ingredients onto wrapper.

Fold one horizontal-to-food edge of wrapper over ingredients. Then, using 3-4 fingers, gently pull folded side back towards ingredients, making sure wrapper is snug against them.

Next, fold over both open ends of roll up to the point where the ingredients are. Roll the wrapper with ingredients toward the opposite horizontal edge. Just before reaching the end of the wrapper, run a wet finger along the edge of wrapper, then continue to finish rolling to the end. Lightly pinch the edge to the roll so that it doesn’t flop open. Place onto plate with corn starch. Repeat process until all rolls are made.

You can either deep fry or pan fry your Shrimp Avocado Rolls. Either way, heat your oil to about 375°. If pan frying, make sure you have enough oil in the pan to cover at least half of the roll. When the bottom half turns golden brown, flip over the rolls and continue until evenly cooked on both sides.

When done, remove rolls from oil and place onto paper towels to absorb excess oil. Allow to cool several minutes before serving.
HINT #1: Cut rolls in half with a sharp knife. They will cool quicker that way and won’t burn your mouth if you get have an unexpected hot-pocket of oil inside the roll.

Serve with your favorite Asian dipping sauce. These were served these with a spicy Plum Sauce – just 4 tablespoons of store-bought Plum Sauce combined with a heaping teaspoon of Ground Chili Sauce.
HINT #2: You can serve this as an appetizer, or plate with some Asian noodles to make it part of your main course.

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cook Time = 10 minutes
Serves 2-4

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Asian, Main Course, Seafood | Tagged: , , , , , | 18 Comments »