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Archive for the ‘Thanksgiving’ Category

Cavemom’s Orange Yam Turkeys

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 24, 2010

Cavemom's Orange Yam Turkeys
This is very exciting! Not only is this a great recipe for a unique spin on a Thanksgiving favorite, it’s also the first recipe shared here on C3 from the Cavemom!! She has been making this delicious version of Yams at our Holiday dinner for years. Now, you can, too!

INGREDIENTS

* 8 Small or Medium Yams
* 4 Thick Skinned Oranges
* 4 Tablespoons Butter, softened well
* 1 20 oz. Can Crushed Pineapple, drained (reserve 1/4 cup)
* 1 Cup Chopped Walnuts or Pecans
* 1 Cup Mini Marshmallows
* 2 Tablespoons Brown Sugar
* 1/4 Cup Orange Juice, reserved from oranges
* 1/4 Cup Pineapple Juice, reserved from pineapples
* Salt & Pepper to taste
* Tin Foil

RECIPE

Place yams and 1/2 a tablespoon of kosher salt into large pot of boiling water.
Yams in boiling water

While yams cook, slice oranges in half. Then, with a paring knife and a spoon, carefully scoop out orange flesh being sure not to cut or tear orange skins.
Scooped Oranges

Reserve 1/3 cup of the fresh orange juice. Eat the orange flesh at your leisure (they also make for a great fruit salad).
Reserved Orange Flesh & Juice

Once the yams are fully cooked, drain from water, allow to cool slightly, and remove skin. Place skinned yams into a large bowl or container along with butter, orange juice, pineapple juice, brown sugar, and salt & pepper to taste. Mash and mix well with a potato masher. Add pineapple and nuts, fold in well.
Mashed Yams

One of the great things about this recipe is that it can be prepared ahead of time and then finished a half hour before serving. If you don’t prepare them right away, bag up the orange skins, place the yams in an airtight container, and refrigerate both until ready for use. Also, DON’T add the nuts until just before you are ready to finish preparing them – you don’t want them to get soggy.
Orange Skins

This is the other great part of this recipe (other than the taste), especially if you team up with your grandkids to create a fun tradition. When you are ready to prepare them, evenly distribute the yam mixture into each of the eight orange skins. Then use some tin foil to make the Turkey’s feathers, and the marshmallows to make the bird’s face (we usually make them smile ;)). Place the yam turkeys on a large cookie sheet and place into an oven preheated to 350°. Cook until hot and marshmallows have browned slightly. Serve with the rest of your Thanksgiving fare.
Cavemom's Orange Yam Turkeys

A wish to you for a healthy, happy, and delicious Thanksgiving from the “Cavemom”.

Prep Time = 30 minutes
Cook Time = 20 minutes
Serves 8

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Side Dishes, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Pumpkin Whoopie Pies

Posted by cavewomanbaking on November 22, 2010

Food Blogs Post of the Day for 1/22/10

This recipe won Post of the Day for 1/22/10!


With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we have been inundated with inquiries seeking a “different” dessert recipe for the big day. This Pumpkin Whoopie Pie recipe from the Cavewoman fits the bill perfectly. While it is a repost of her first guest recipe here on C3, the response these little disks of yum receive make them well worth it. Besides, these Whoopie Pies also garnered Post Of The Day honors! Well … what are you waiting for?!? Read on!! 😉

INGREDIENTS

* 1 1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter, 1 stick melted, 1/2 stick softened
* 1 cup packed light brown sugar
* 2 large eggs, at room temperature, lightly beaten
* 1 cup canned pure pumpkin puree
* 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
* 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
* 1 teaspoon baking powder
* 1 teaspoon baking soda
* 3/4 teaspoon plus 2 pinches salt
* 1-2/3 cups flour
* 4 ounces cream cheese, chilled
* 1 cup confectioners’ sugar

RECIPE

Hi, I’m Dianne, Caveman’s favorite wife. I’m actually his only wife, but that is besides the point. He’s been lagging on posting recipes this week (he’s lazy … and sick). So, I thought I’d invade his blog and post the best Winter cookie ever. It’s the yummiest. Truly, I don’t lie. Well, on occasion I do, but I’m not now. I swear! 😉 Doesn’t this look good?!?! It is. I should know, I just ate three. (Don’t judge, I had to test them!!)
Whisk together the melted butter, brown sugar, eggs, pumpkin puree, pumpkin spice, vanilla, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Fold in flour with a rubber spatula.

I’m not condoning eating raw dough……but…..this dough tastes amazing! Like pumpkin mousse!! Soooo good!!!

Make 24 generous mounds on 2 cookie sheets. Bake 10 minutes at 350 until cookie is springy to touch.

Meanwhile, using an electric mixer, cream the softened butter with the cream cheese. Add the confectioners’ sugar and the remaining 2 pinches salt and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla; mix on low speed until blended, then beat on medium-high speed until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Spread the flat side of 12 cakes with the cream cheese frosting. Top each with another cake.

This is how I eat them. That way there is more frosting to cookie ratio. 😉

Enjoy!!!

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cook Time = 10
Makes 12 two-sided Whoopie Pies

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Desserts, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , | 16 Comments »

Thawing Your Turkey

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 18, 2010

If your Thanksgiving turkey is frozen, you are going to need to make some plans in the next several days to start defrosting it. The method you choose, and the size of your bird, will determine when you need to commence the thawing process in order to guarantee you won’t be left with a giant odd-shaped curling stone on the big day.
When defrosting a turkey it is critical to follow strict guidelines so as to not poison yourself and your guests with some bacteria borne illness. Personally, I don’t like the microwave method because the bird usually starts to cook in the process. So, I try to follow one of two thawing procedures, the Refrigerator Method (the slow, and best way) or the Cold Water Method (the quick way).

Refrigerator Method (Recommended)

For this procedure it is important to really plan ahead. You need to allow about 24 hours for every 5 pounds in a fridge set to 40 °F. Here are the approximate times to thaw a whole Turkey:

8 to 12 pounds -> 1 to 2 days
12 to 16 pounds -> 2 to 3 days
16 to 20 pounds -> 3 to 4 days
20 to 24 pounds -> 4 to 5 days

Cold Water Method (Acceptable)

Make sure the turkey is in leak-proof packaging … they absorb water like crazy. Cover the turkey completely in cold water. Be sure to change the water every so often and allow about 30 minutes per pound when thawing a turkey this way.

8 to 12 pounds -> 4 to 6 hours
12 to 16 pounds -> 6 to 8 hours
16 to 20 pounds -> 8 to 10 hours
20 to 24 pounds -> 10 to 12 hours

Either brine or cook your turkey immediately upon completing one of the above defrosting methods. By following these simple steps your bird should be safe to eat and, next year, your guests won’t be making up strange excuses as to why they can’t join you for Thanksgiving. 😉

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Thanksgiving, Tools & Tips | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Thanksgiving Prep

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 16, 2010

I don’t know about you but, for the Caveclan, Thanksgiving is the holiday we look forward to the most. A day filled with friends and family, fantastic football, and fabulous food is certainly a day worth giving thanks for. Which is why, when the Cavewoman and I wed, we chose Turkey Day as the one we would host for the entire family. Yeah, it is a lot of work in the kitchen. But, seeing everyone slumped into the couch, satiated and smiling, is worth every moment spent hoping not to burn the gravy or undercook the bird.
Over the last dozen years, we have incorporated some of our families’ recipes with our own to create a meal that has become a tradition … to the point we are threatened with embarrassing public revelations from our pasts if we change anything. Making blackmail truly the most sincere form of flattery you can receive! 😉 With that in mind, I want to share with you some of the recipes we’ll be employing next week for the big day. I hope to also post a few new recipes over the next week that we will be enjoying this year, as well.
Before getting to real meal, we try to tempt our guests palates with some basic, yet delicious appetizers. And, shrimp cocktail is about as basic as it gets. However, a chilled shrimp is only as good as the sauce that accompanies it. You could make your own sauce from scratch. But, that is time consuming and, as you know, we like to make things as easy as possible around here. Thus, with necessity being the mother of invention, came the recipe for Cave’s Quick Cocktail Sauce. As the name suggests, it’s quick, it’s easy, and man is it goooooood! If there is any doubt about how good it really is, on a holiday known for leftovers, there are never any leftover shrimp!
As good as those little crustaceans bathed in that sauce are, man (and, more specifically, the vegetarian Cavewoman) can’t live on prawns alone. So, we also whip up an incredible veggie friendly Baked Brie with Peach Sauce. When coupled with the dried cherries and pecans, this gooey plate of yum becomes a huge hit. Serve it up with some quality Lavosh or water crackers and let the feasting begin!
NOTE: Even though you will want to dig right in, be sure to let the baked brie cool for about 10 minutes after pulling it from the oven as the melted cheese inside the brie casing can get quite hot. Nothing worse than burning your tongue on that first bite and not be able to taste the full flavor of the rest of the meal. Yes, this is the voice of experience talking! 😳

Too often, one of the cornerstones of the Thanksgiving meal is taken for granted. The cranberry sauce! Serving it right out of the can isn’t worthy of the time and effort most will put into their holiday spread. You could just follow the rather simple directions that come on a bag of fresh cranberries … at least that is a huge step up from pre-made. But, if you want to bump it up a major notch, I suggest you take the few extra steps recommended in our Cave’s Cranberry Sauce recipe. It’s still very simple to make. But, instead of having your cran-sauce be just an also-ran on the plate, it will become one of the stars of your holiday meal. In fact, you just might find yourself making this dish throughout the year!
Of course, it isn’t Thanksgiving without a turkey. However, it isn’t much of a Thanksgiving, foodwise, if your bird isn’t flavorful, juicy and tender. Fortunately, there is one thing you can do to help assure you achieve all three of those lofty goals: marinate your turkey in brine! My now-famous T-day Turkey Brine is one of those modified/modernized family recipes that has been handed down from my Cavenana to my Cavemom, and most recently to me. Combing wine, fresh grapes, garlic, rosemary and various other ingredients for an overnight marinade creates a turkey that is perfect nearly every time. Turkeys done this way usually don’t have much in the way of drippings because the bird retains so much of the moisture. But, it also helps make the meal’s main attraction tender, moist and full of flavor.
Like I said, these are just a few of the recipes we will be whipping up in the coming days. We should have a few more to share before you start winging it around the kitchen. No matter what you end up making, we wish you and yours a safe, savory and happy Thanksgiving. And, don’t be bashful about telling the people sharing your holiday table how thankful you are for having them in your life – it is the only true fail-safe ingredient to a successful T-Day gathering.

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Thanksgiving | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

How Do You Eat Thanksgiving?

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 28, 2009

The debate raged at the Thanksgiving table: Combo or Solo? Combine the various foods on the plate to create a flavor bonanza; or, eat them separately, savoring the unique essence each possessed? The answers, and the reasons behind them, were wide and varied. But, it was fun to hear how everybody approached one of the most anticipated meals of the year.
Personally, I go for a combination of the two. My first bite of each item is always solo so as to give me an opportunity to taste the merits of each dish. Then, after having sampled them all, I go to the combos, seeking the perfect flavor combinations. The best part is experimenting to find the “Ultimate Combo”.
Yes, I probably give this too much thought. But, since I’ve already gone this far … How do you eat your Thanksgiving meal?

©2009 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Holidays, Thanksgiving | Tagged: , , , , | 7 Comments »

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 24, 2009


I’ll be taking the next two days off from posting anything new so that I can prepare for our T-day gathering. I will be checking in, though, in case there are any last minute Thanksgiving-related questions.
If you are wondering what the Cave-menu will be:
APPETIZERS
Jumbo Shrimp Cocktail
Baked Brie with Pecans & Peach Sauce

MAIN COURSE
Turkey (brined for 24 hours in T-Day Turkey Brine)
Focaccia Bread Stuffing with Water Chestnuts
Spinach Souffle
Orange Stuffed Yams
Cave’s Cranberry Sauce
Garlic Mashed Potatoes
Fresh Dinner Rolls
Cavey Gravy

DESSERT (All homemade)
Pumpkin Pie
Pecan Pie
Apple Pie
Whipped Cream

Some of these recipes not already posted will make it to this blog in the coming week or so. But, on Friday, I’ll post something to take your mind off of Turkey Day leftovers – Easy Chicken Parm!
From our family to you and yours, a wish for a safe, happy and flavorful Thanksgiving.

©2009 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it. DYU2JMTZGHFS

Posted in Holidays, Thanksgiving | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Cave’s Cranberry Sauce

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 22, 2009


With Thanksgiving just days away, thought it was a good time to share this one. Just add a few extra ingredients to the package recipe and this becomes one of the best Cranberry Sauces you’ve ever made.

INGREDIENTS

2 12oz. Packages Fresh or Frozen Cranberries (6 cups)
2 Cups Sugar
2 Cups Water
1/4 Cup Red Wine, Brandy, or Cognac
2 Tbsp. Molasses
OPTIONAL:
1/2 tsp. Orange Zest

RECIPE

Rinse Cranberries very well, drain . Set aside.

Place water, sugar, wine and molasses into medium/large sauce pan. Bring to a boil, stirring often.
HINT #1: Port Wine, Brandy or Cognac may be used instead of Red Wine. Each gives a unique and wonderful flavor.

Put cranberries into sauce pan and return to boil, stirring often.

Once all cranberries have popped and foam begins to form around all of them, remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.

When cooled, stir one more time, place into bowl, cover, and refrigerate at least 4 hours.
HINT #2: This is much better when made a day in advance. Plus, it’s one less thing you need to worry about on Turkey Day!

OPTIONAL:
If you find this recipe too sweet for your tastes you can easily cut it a bit, while also adding some citrus zing, by adding a 1/2  teaspoon of Orange zest when putting the other ingredients into the water, before boiling.

Prep Time = 2 minutes
Cook Time = 20 total minutes
Serves 8-10 (with leftovers)

©2009 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Holidays, Rubs, Sauces, Marinades & Dressings, Side Dishes, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , | 8 Comments »

T-day Turkey Brine

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 9, 2009


I have had several requests for my Thanksgiving Day Turkey Brine. Since we are coming up on the big day, I thought I’d share.

INGREDIENTS

1 to 1.5 full bottle of White Wine (if you use a whole bottle, have a spare ready for basting purposes – see note below)
1/3 – 1/2 Cup Olive Oil
1 Medium bunch of Red Seedless Grapes, rinsed and halved
2-3 Tbsp. Chopped Garlic
2-3 Tbsp. Fresh Rosemary (Dried is okay to use, too. Can also substitute Sage or Thyme, according to taste)
2 Tbsp. World Spice Merchants “Biscayne Citrus Rub”
2 tsp Kosher or Sea Salt
1 tsp Seasoned pepper

RECIPE

Combine all ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Be sure to crush the grapes slightly, in your hands, as you put them into the bowl Mix thoroughly.
Place bird in a large trash bag (or extra-large brining bag) and cover with brine, being sure to get some of the mixture into the body cavity. Loosely knot bag (or zipper brining bag), place bagged bird into roasting pan (in case the bag leaks) and refrigerate overnight. Be sure to turn the bird several times for even marinating. Remove Turkey from refrigerator at least 20 minutes before cooking. Remove Turkey from brine, prepare and cook turkey as you prefer.
NOTE: Turkeys done this way usually don’t have much in the way of drippings. So, as noted above, have some spare wine handy for basting purposes. You can also use some of the leftover brine during the first 1-2 hours of cooking (Be sure to allow at least an hour and a half of cooking time after last use of brine for basting). Also, I like to leave a bunch of the grapes outside the bird, and a few inside, while cooking – it adds to the flavor.
Turkey will be moist and full of flavor. Enjoy!

Prep Time = 15 minutes
Marinate Time = 24 hours
Marinates 1 Turkey

©2009 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Holidays, Rubs, Sauces, Marinades & Dressings, Thanksgiving | Tagged: , , , , , | 6 Comments »