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Archive for the ‘Main Course’ Category

Cavey’s Chicken Ziti

Posted by Caveman Cooking on October 19, 2017

Cavey's Chicken Ziti
Been so long sice I answered the bell for a new recipe, I’m feeling a lot like Ferris Bueller … “Caveman? Caveman? Caveman?”. But, I am coming out of my self-imposed hiatus with a true winner – my baked chicken ziti. Super easy to make; incredibly delicious; freezable for future meals; and, with Fall setting in, it is a meal that will stick to any Neanderthal’s ribs. What else could you want? For those that replied, “You to make it for me.”, dinner is at 6:30pm. 😉

INGREDIENTS

6 Cups Cavey’s Italian Sauce
1 Pound Ziti
2 Boneless Chicken Breasts
6-7 Slices Provolone Cheese
2 Cups Shredded Mozzarella Cheese
1.5 TBS Shredded Parmesan Cheese
1.5 TBS Dried Italian Herbs
1 TBS Minced Garlic
1 TBS Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper to taste

RECIPE

Prepare 6 ups worth of Cavey’s Italian Sauce and set aside. Shred mozzarella cheese and set aside.
Cavey's Italian Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella

Cook the Ziti according to directions on package. Be sure to cook it “a la denté” … slightly underdone, as it will continue to cooking when we get to the baking stage. Drain well.
NOTE: If you can’t find Ziti, Penné, Rigatoni, or other short pasta tubes will work just fine.
Boiling Pasta

Return Ziti to pot, add 1/4 to 1/2 of a cup of the Italian sauce, and gently stir in evenly. Set aside.
Pasta with Cavey's Italian Sauce

Cut chicken into large bite-sized pieces. In a large skillet, warm olive oil, quickly sauté garlic, add chicken, Italian herbs, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook until almost done.
NOTE: Don’t overcook or it will get dry during baking.
Sautéed Sliced Chicken

Add 1/4 to 1/2 of a cup of the Italian sauce and continue to sauté for another minute. Then, remove from heat and set aside.
HINT: Once you have your sauce simmering, most of the remaining steps above can be done simultaneously. It’s a real time saver!
Sautéd Chicken in Italian Sauce

Take a large, deep baking dish butter it well. Place a layer of half the pasta evenly into the dish. Evenly distribute half the cooked chicken and cover with half the remaining sauce. Completely cover with slices of Provolone cheese.
First Set of Layers for Baked Ziti

Now, evenly distribute the remainder of the pasta, chicken and sauce (in that order). Cover with Mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses.
Second Layers for Baked Ziti

Preheat oven to 350°, cover baking dish, and place into oven for 20 minutes. Then, uncover baking dish and place back into the oven for another 10 minutes.
Cooking Baked Ziti

Remove from oven when cheese begins to bubble and the edges are golden brown. Let stand for 5-10 minutes (Yes, I realize it’s difficult to not just dig in. But, you need to let it set up).
Cavey's Baked Chicken Ziti

Spoon into plates and serve with garlic bread and a salad. YUMMMMMMMMM!
Cavey's Baked Chicken Ziti

HINT: For a vegetarian version, just remove the chicken from the equation, or add Gardein meatless chicken strips, instead.
HINT #2: This is a great dish to make ahead of time. You can either refrigerate it unbaked for up to 3 days, or freeze unbaked for up to 3 months. Just be sure to cover it well.

Prep Time = 45 minutes
Cooking Time = 30 minutes
Serves 6-8

©2017 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

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Killer Chili Rojo (Red Pork) Tamales

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 4, 2015

Killer Chili Rojo (Red Pork) Tamales
I gave you my Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamale recipe a few months back. Though, I probably should have posted it’s carnivore counterpart sooner, I felt, with Christmas right around the corner, now would be a perfect time to share it. While this remains a labor intensive recipe, it really is a very easy dish to pull off. Besides, if you gather your masses together for an assembly line when it comes time to actually fill and roll the tamales, it goes by very quickly. When you finally unwrap one and take a bite, you’ll forget about all the steps involved!

INGREDIENTS

Chili Rojo (Meat Filling):
1 Preparation of Chili Rojo Rub
2.5 Pounds Pork Butt (Shoulder) Roast
1/2 Red Onion
5 Cloves Garlic – Smashed
1 Teaspoon Kosher or Sea Salt
1 1/4 Cups Red Chili Sauce
1 1/4 Cup Chili Rojo Stock – Reserved

Masa (Dough):
5 Cups Tamal (Instant Masa Mix)
4 1/2 Cups Vegetable Stock
1/2 Cup Chili Rojo Stock – Reserved
2 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1.5 Teaspoon Salt
2 1/8 Cups Vegetable Shortening
1 1/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

1 Package Hoja (Dried Corn Husks)

RECIPE

Follow the instructions for one preparation of Chili Rojo Rub.
Chili Rojo Rub

Cover pork butt roast liberally with the rub. Cover tightly with plastic wrap, place on a plate, and refrigerate overnight.
Pork Butt Roast Covered With Chili Rojo Rub

The next day, remove the roast from the refrigerator 15-20 minutes before you are ready to start cooking. Slice onion into quarters. Peel and smash garlic cloves.
Quartered Onion & Smashed Garlic

Place pork roast into a stock pot. Cover with water by 2-3 inches. Add onion, garlic, and salt. Bring to a boil. Then, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 2.5 hours, until fall-apart tender.
Pork Roast In Stock Pot

When done, remove the pork roast from the stock pot and place onto a large platter. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes, then shred meat with two forks or, if you have them, meat claws. Be sure to separate the meat from the fat, and discard the latter.
Shredded Chili Rojo

Reserve 1 3/4 of the meat stock (1 1/4 for the meat, 1/2 for the masa) and set aside.
Reserving Meat Stock

Place the shredded meat into a large sauce pot, add Red Chili Sauce and reserved meat stock, and heat uncovered over a low flame for 20 minutes. Stir often.
NOTE: You’ll likely have some left over meat filling. Don’t sweat it, it makes for a great version of Carnitas!
Saucing & Reheating Meat Filling

Cover the Hoja (corn husks) with cool water for at least 40 minutes. When thoroughly soaked, squeeze excess water out then place into a colander to allow rest of excess water to drip out. Do not let the husks dry completely – they must be moist and pliable when wrapping the tamales.
HINT: Place a heavy plate on top of the husks so that they stay completely submerged.
Soaking The Hoja (Corn Husks)

While the meat filling is simmering and the Hojas soaking, make your Masa (dough). Place shortening into mixer and whip it until silky (3-4 minutes). Yes, Devo fans. I said, whip it. Whip it good!
Whipped Shortening

Meanwhile, place all the dry ingredients (Tamal, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together.
Dry Ingredients

Add vegetable stock and meat stock to dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix well until evenly distributed.
Dry Ingredients With Vegetable Stock

Add ingredients from mixing bowl to whipped shortening. Again, whip it until smooth and creamy (3-4 minutes). And yes, again, whip it good!
Whipped Masa (Dough)

Now’s the time to gather the clan and press them into service. Pop open a cold one, put on some good tunes, and make a party of it!
Place one of the large Hoja (husks) on a flat surface and spoon about 2 tablespoons of the masa (dough) onto it. Now, this is where some tamale veterans may cringe, but I have found that this next step makes things go much faster and smoother. Take a small piece of plastic wrap and place it over the masa. With your hand, smooth and spread the masa out evenly, leaving several inches from the bottom of the husk, a couple inches from the top and far edge, and less than an inch from the near edge. The masa layer should be about 1/4″ thick. Remove the plastic wrap and set aside to use again. Then, scoop about 2 tablespoons of the Chili Rojo (meat filling) into the center of the masa.
HINT: If your Hoja are on the smaller side, just overlap two of them by a few inches to make one big leaf. Use a rubber spatula to spread a little masa on the near edge of the bottom husk to act as “glue”.
Making Tamales: Steps 1, 2, and 3

This is where a history of being a Hippie or Rastafarian, comes in handy. Take the near side of the Hoja and fold it over the the far edge. With your fingertips, lightly press the edges of the masa down to seal in the meat. Then, while holding down the far edge of the husk, push down and draw back the near edge of the husk an inch or two so that the masa forms a sealed tube, of sorts. Now, fold up the bottom (narrow) end of the Hoja, making sure it is snug up to the bottom of the filling. Finally, roll the entire thing away from you, over the remaining flap, and …
Making Tamales: Steps 4, 5, and 6

… KaBOOOOOOOM! You have a tamale!! Most folks say tying up the open end of your tamale is optional. But, tying them up with a strip of Hoja keeps all the ingredients inside, and also helps make them look better when done.
Finished Tamales

Once you have formed all of your tamales, fill the bottom of a large steamer pot with water, place the steam insert into the bottom, and cover it with several Hoja leaves. Stack the finished tamales standing up in the steamer. Bring the water to a boil and cover the steamer, allowing the tamales to steam for about 30 minutes.
HINT: You’ll notice that the one tamale I didn’t tie up leaked out the top. Which is why I strongly urge you to give them the “50 Shades Of Grey” treatment.
Steamer, Raw Tamales, and Steamed Tamales

When you think they are done, remove one to test. When it has cooled sufficiently, unwrap it and enjoy. If it has steamed sufficiently, remove the rest from the steamer. Serve with avocado, guacamole, pico de gallo, salsa, rice and beans … you name it! These also freeze very well for future use. Just re-steam them or nuke ’em in the microwave, once they have defrosted.
Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

Give these a try … you won’t be disappointed. I’ve had several Hispanic friends swear me to secrecy that they actually liked these better than their Mom’s. Don’t worry, amigos … I’m not naming names! 😉

Marinate Time = 24 Hours
Prep Time = 90 minutes
Cooking Time = 3 Hours
Makes 28-32 Tamales

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Christmas, Holidays, Latin, Main Course, Side Dishes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

Posted by Caveman Cooking on May 14, 2015

Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales
While this is a labor intensive recipe, and I’m all about the easy, it isn’t a very difficult dish to pull off. Besides, if you gather the whole Caveclan together for an assembly line when it comes time to actually fill and roll the tamales, it goes by very quickly. Plus, when you finally unwrap one and take a bite, you’ll forget about all the steps involved!

INGREDIENTS

Masa (Dough):
3 Cups Tamal (Instant Masa Mix)
3 Cups Vegetable Stock
1 1/2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
1 Teaspoon Salt
1 1/3 Cups Vegetable Shortening
3/4 Teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

Relleno (Filling):
10 Ounces Mexican Melting Cheese – Shredded (I prefer Manchego or Oaxaca; can substitute Jack)
1/2 Cup Canned Chilies – Diced
1/2 Cup Salsa Verde

1 Package Hoja (Dried Corn Husks)

RECIPE

Cover the Hoja (corn husks) with cool water for 30-40 minutes. When thoroughly soaked, squeeze excess water out then place into a colander to allow rest of excess water to drip out. Do not let the husks dry completely – they must be moist and pliable when wrapping the tamales.
HINT: Place a heavy plate on top of the husks so that they stay completely submerged.
Soaking The Hoja (Corn Husks)

Place shortening into mixer and whip it until silky (3-4 minutes). Yes, Devo fans. I said, whip it. Whip it good!
Whipped Shortening

Meanwhile, place all the dry ingredients (Tamal, baking powder, salt, cayenne pepper) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together.
Dry Ingredients

Add vegetable stock to dry ingredients. Using your hands, mix well until evenly distributed.
Dry Ingredients With Vegetable Stock

Add ingredients from mixing bowl to whipped shortening. Again, whip it until smooth and creamy (3-4 minutes). And yes, again, whip it good!
Whipped Masa (Dough)

In the interim, place shredded cheese, diced chilies, and salsa verde into a medium mixing bowl and fold together until completely mixed.
NOTE: Believe it or not, now the real work begins! Gather your minions, if you can … or pop open the beverage of your choice and get ready to roll.
Cheese, Chilies, and Salsa Verde

Place one of the large Hoja (husks) on a flat surface and spoon about 2 tablespoons of the masa (dough) onto it. Now, this is where some tamale veterans may cringe, but I have found that this next step makes things go much faster and smoother. Take a small piece of plastic wrap and place it over the masa. With your hand, smooth and spread the masa out evenly, leaving several inches from the bottom of the husk, a couple inches from the top and far edge, and less than an inch from the near edge. The masa layer should be about 1/4″ thick. Remove the plastic wrap and set aside to use again. Then, scoop about 2 tablespoons of the relleno (filling) into the center of the masa.
HINT: If your Hoja are on the smaller side, just overlap two of them by a few inches to make one big leaf. Use a rubber spatula to spread a little masa on the near edge of the bottom husk to act as “glue”.
Making Tamales: Steps 1, 2, and 3

This is where a history of being a Rastafarian, or a teenager in the 1960’s, comes in handy. Take the near side of the Hoja and fold it over the the far edge. With your fingertips, lightly press the edges of the masa down to seal in the relleno. Then, while holding down the far edge of the husk, push down and draw back the near edge of the husk an inch or two so that the filling forms a sealed tube, of sorts. Now, fold up the bottom (narrow) end of the Hoja, making sure it is snug up to the bottom of the filling. Finally, roll the entire thing away from you, over the remaining flap, and …
Making Tamales: Steps 4, 5, and 6

… BOOM! You have a tamale!! Most folks say tying up the open end of your tamale is optional. But, with cheese tamales, the relleno has a tendency to bubble out, especially if you haven’t sealed in the masa well on the top end. Tying them up with a strip of Hoja not only solves that problem, but it also make them look better!
Finished Tamales

Once you have formed all of your tamales, fill the bottom of a large steamer pot with water, place the steam insert into the bottom, and cover it with several Hoja leaves. Stack the finished tamales standing up in the steamer. Bring the water to a boil and cover the steamer, allowing the tamales to steam for about 30-35 minutes.
HINT: You’ll notice that the one tamale I didn’t tie up leaked out the top. Which is why I strongly urge you to give them the “50 Shades Of Grey” treatment.
Steamer, Raw Tamales, and Steamed Tamales

When you think they are done, remove one to test. When it has cooled sufficiently, unwrap it and enjoy. If it has steamed sufficiently, remove the rest from the steamer. Serve with avocado, guacamole, pico de gallo, salsa, rice and beans … you name it! These also freeze very well for future use. Just re-steam them or nuke ’em in the microwave, once they have defrosted.
Killer Queso (Cheese) Tamales

For those of you who are dedicated carnivores, don’t worry. I’ve posted the carne (meat) version of these tasty bundles right here!

Prep Time = 90 minutes
Cooking Time = 30-35 minutes
Makes 22-24 Tamales

©2015 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Appetizers, Christmas, Holidays, Latin, Main Course, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

C3TV: Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 20, 2013


This dish is so simple to make, yet it will make you look like you’re a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu! In fact it is so quick and easy, you can make a mid-week meal feel as if it was a special occasion!! This recipe is bursting with flavor, and sure to become one of your clan’s favorites. You can also give it a whirl with some thick-cut Boneless Pork Loin in place of the chicken, if you’d prefer.

Episode 201

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in C3TV, Main Course | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 15, 2013

C3TV - Watch This RecipeSuper Stuffed Chicken Breasts
I can’t believe that I haven’t posted this recipe yet! We have been enjoying it for several years around the Cavehold. Plus, it is about to make an appearance on a new episode of C3TV. So, I figured I’d better get it up on here, PRONTO! Enjoy!!

INGREDIENTS

4 Skinless, Boneless Chicken Breasts
8 Fresh Basil Leaves
4 Slices Semi-Soft Cheese
4 Heaping Teaspoons Pine Nuts
3 Garlic Cloves – Minced
Salt & Pepper to taste

RECIPE

Rinse basil leaves, and pat dry. Toast pine nuts until lightly golden (add a pinch of salt, if desired).
Rinsed Basil and Toasted Pine Nuts

Mince garlic, and slice cheese.
NOTE: While just about any semi-soft cheese will work well, smoked Gouda is a very good choice for this dish. If you want to take it up several rungs on the evolution scale, try some aged Cougar Gold White Cheddar from the Washington State University Creamery.
Minced Garlic and Sliced Cheese

With a sharp knife, cut a pocket into the chicken breasts … taking care not to slice all the way through. Stuff each breast with one slice of cheese, two basil leaves, 1/2 teaspoon of garlic, and a teaspoon of pine nuts. Then, with a turkey lacer, seal up the hole (sometimes, it takes two lacers).
HINT: You can substitute the chicken for some thick-cut boneless Pork Loin. That’s all about the YUM!
Slicing Pocket, Stuffing Breast, and Sealing Hole.

Place finished breasts onto a greased cookie sheet and sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste. Place into a 400° preheated oven for 35-40 minutes.
Salt and Pepper To Taste

When finished, remove from oven and, with a couple of forks, remove turkey lacers.
Finished Stuffed Chicken Breasts

That’s all folks! Serve them alongside some rice pilaf or Garlic Mashed Taters and some Sautéed Veggies and you’ll be eating like a King … while only putting in the effort of a Neanderthal!!
Super Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Prep Time = 20 minutes
Cook Time = 40 minutes
Serves 4

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Main Course | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

A Neanderthal Thanksgiving

Posted by Caveman Cooking on November 27, 2013

T-Day Turkey BrineWell, the big day isn’t until tomorrow, but the cooking almost certainly starts in earnest today. So, if you are looking for a few last minute Turkey Day ideas, I thought I’d share the annual standards we employ in the Cavehold.

I just posted my famous Cavey Gravy recipe the other day. But, you’ll need to put that gravy on something (though, some have considered just grabbing the gravy boat and a straw! 😉 ). Of course, the main event (ie. turkey) is a prime candidate to be smothered in that savory sauce, which calls for a start 24 hours before you pop it into the oven. That’s because we always use our T-day Turkey Brine to ensure a moist, flavorful bird. White wine, grapes, garlic, and rosemary are the mainstays of this magnificent marinade.

Garlic Mashed TatersOne thing that most Thanksgiving gobblers agree on: mashed potatoes are a must! Plus, they are another traditional landing pad for the gravy. But, if you are going to cook like a Caveman, you are going to have to bump it up a notch or two. We accomplish that with our tasty Garlic Mashed Taters. Milk, sour cream, and cream cheese are all combined into this recipe to create a creamy, delectable side dish … which does make it the “Angioplasty Special”. Though, if you are only cranking these spuds out once or twice a year, your cardiologist shouldn’t mind too much. I can attest that your taste buds won’t complain one bit!

Every meal calls for a vegetable. But, even the most anti-veggie attendee can’t turn their nose up on the Cavewoman’s incredible Super Spinach Soufflé. With eggs, two kinds of cheeses, milk, and butter it is plainlySuper Spinach Soufflé obvious that this is not a healthy dish, either. So, we try to cut out some of the fat by using non-fat milk and light sour cream. It works great, and there is plenty of other fat in there to more than make up the difference! I guarantee if you try this one at your T-Day feast once, it will become a regular participant in your family’s faire for years to come.
HINT: I highly recommend that you get some Cougar Gold from the WSU Creamery for this recipe. It adds the perfect flavor that just pushes the entire dish over the top.

Holiday cooking has always been where my Mom shines brightest in the kitchen. Her creative mind is always at work … but, none more so than when she puts her signature touch on a recipe. This is plainly evident with her Cavemom’s Orange Yam TurkeysCavemom’s Orange Yam Turkeys – an ingenious spin on the traditional Thanksgiving yams. This unique, colorful, and tasty dish has become a real favorite of the Cavekids … not just to eat, but to make as well. They really look forward to working in the kitchen on these with their Cavenana, and this year is no different! They’ve already been asking us if their grandmother was “bringing all the stuff to make Yam Turkeys”. Put one of these on your guest’s plate, and I guarantee they will be ooing and cooing about how cute they are. That is, until they taste it and start oohing and awing about how delicious they are! Yams, orange, pineapple, nuts, marshmallows, butter … I mean, what could be bad about that, right?!?!

Cave’s Cranberry SauceYou can’t call it a Thanksgiving meal without cranberry sauce. However, far too many call it “good” with a canned variety of the tangy berry relish. If you are in that crowd, I strongly advise you step out of your canned comfort zone and give my Cave’s Cranberry Sauce a go. It will only take an extra 20 minutes in your meal’s preparation, and you will end up with a C-sauce that will forever have you shunning the pre-made type in the future. Plus, it’s easy … just the recipe on the package with some molasses and either wine, port, cognac or brandy added. Best of all, you can make it a day or two ahead of time and refrigerate it until chow time – which actually also helps it to set up better, both flavor and consistency wise. The only problem with that is keeping everyone away from it until the big meal … the Cavewoman is our biggest offender on that!

Most of all, we wish you the sweetest of Thanksgiving Holidays, filled with laughter, love, and memories to last a lifetime!

©2013 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. These recipes originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. These recipes may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies them.

Posted in Holidays, Main Course, Rubs, Sauces, Marinades & Dressings, Side Dishes, Thanksgiving, Vegetables, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

C3TV: Dutch Oven R&R Pulled Pork

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 5, 2011

Here it is! The world premier of our new online video cooking series!! Please be sure to leave your comments, as we strive to improve the show with each and every episode. Also, be sure to view all the way through the credits for some added “bonus footage”. 😉

Being a Caveman and all, I love to put meat on the grill or in the smoker. That said, I must challenge the purists who insist that good Pulled Pork has to be cooked via one of those methods. This recipe will prove that this dish doesn’t always have to be made in the great outdoors.

Series Premier
Episode 101

©2011 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at https://cavemancooking.wordpress.com authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in BBQ, C3TV, Main Course, Rubs, Sauces, Marinades & Dressings, Sandwiches | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 32 Comments »

R&R Pulled Pork Tacos & Gnarly Nachos

Posted by Caveman Cooking on March 21, 2011

R&R Pulled Pork Tacos Yeah, I know … I’ve been lagging BIG TIME around here. Rather than bore you with all mundane, yet legitimate, excuses as to why, I think I’d rather share this delicious combo of American BBQ and south of the border flavors! Besides, wouldn’t you rather have a delectable new dish to try instead of being up to date on the daily trials and tribulations of an ordinary Neanderthal??? I thought so! 😉 These tacos are kind of a domesticated version of the famous Al Pastor taco found in most authentic Mexican taquerias. First thing you’ll need to do is follow the instructions for preparing one recipe of Dutch Oven R&R Pulled Pork. Be sure to start that recipe a day ahead, as you will have to marinate the pork shoulder overnight with some smokey dry rub – we prefer our homemade BBQ Rub-a-dub which was developed specifically for this recipe. Once it is in the oven cooking, you’ll want to get on making the R&R BBQ Sauce, which takes a couple hours of simmering on the stove top. By the way, don’t be afraid to try this sweet and spicy sauce on ribs, beef, chicken, or anything else you might barbeque. You’ll definitely want to top those tacos with some salsa (We’ll have to write up our simple and rapid salsa recipe for you soon … it will make you forego bottled salsas for good!) and some guacamole. Since the Pulled Pork and BBQ sauce cook for so long, you’ll have plenty of time to whip up some Rockin’ Guac. Be sure to make extra, because not only are you likely to be nibbling on some before the meal, but you’ll also need some to go with the Nachos! Speaking of which, the recipe for our Gnarly Nachos is so simple, we are actually going to abandon the usual step-by-step photo instructions and just spell it out for you here. Take a medium sized baking dish or pan and lightly coat with non-stick spray. cover the bottom with a single layer of your favorite tortilla chips. Top the chips with scattered spoonfuls of refried beans (we use the vegetarian variety for the herbivores in our Cave clan), then cover with shredded cheddar cheese. Add another layer of chips, and repeat the process with the beans and cheese. Place in an oven preheated to 350° for 10-15 minutes, until cheese is completely melted and the beans are hot. When done, remove from oven and top with pickled Jalapeno slices, salsa, and guac. If you like, you can also add chopped tomatoes and onions, sour cream, cilantro … you name it! When the pulled pork recipe is complete, heat up some corn tortillas, top them with a healthy scoop of the tender meat and top with guac and salsa. I guarantee that the mewls of palatable pleasure you will hear around the dining table will be the perfect musical compliment to these devine dishes! ©2011 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in BBQ, Latin, Main Course, Side Dishes, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

Super Bowl Chili Anyone?

Posted by Caveman Cooking on February 3, 2011

2+2 Tequila Chili
I know what you’re saying. “Hey! Cave!! What’s the deal?!? You haven’t posted anything since last year!!!”. Well, a) It’s only been a month since last year, and b) you’re right!
BTW, can you believe January 2011 is already gone??? Impossible, right?!?
But, I digress. I promise to get back on the horse. Right now! In fact, I have two new recipes I will post up in the next few days. However, before we get to something new, we have to resurrect an old favorite in honor of the impending Super Sunday (one of the few silver linings I find in January’s demise). And, what Super Bowl gathering is truly complete without some award winning homemade chili? The question is rhetorical, of course, since the answer is unquestionably obvious.
So, we’d be remiss if we didn’t offer up this reminder of what our 2+2 Tequila Chili is all about. According to most, it’s all about the “yummmmmmmmmmmm!”. If you like two kinds of meat; plump beans; sauteed onions; and a multitude of seasonings, sauces, and herbs combining to make a flavor explosion in your mouth, then you are likely to agree. It’s easy to make, and even better the next day. Allowing you to make it ahead of time and enjoy more of the big game festivities, rather than be enslaved to the kitchen when the big play (or killer commercial) is on the screen. Besides, don’t you want your Super Meal to look something like this:
2+2 Tequila Chili

‘Nuff said? 😉 ENJOY!!

©2011 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

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Veggie Wonton Soup

Posted by Caveman Cooking on December 9, 2010

Veggie Wonton Soup
While doing our recent REVIEW: Man Pans Stir Fry Wok & Steamer Set, I made some of this fabulous, veggie-friendly soup. I also promised to share the recipe. Since I never lie (well, almost never ;)) here it is! Oh, and by the way, this gets rave reviews from the Cavewoman, a lifelong vegetarian, as well as from the Cavekids and me, lifelong carnetarians! Though, as you’ll see, this is easily adjusted to satisfy the meat-only crowd.

INGREDIENTS

6 Cups Vegetable Broth
1 1/2 Cups Sliced Mushrooms (Baby Bella or Shitake)
10 Ounces Firm Tofu
8 Ounces Water Chestnuts
5 Green Onions
12 Wonton Wrappers
1/4 Teaspoon Sesame Oil or Chili Sesame Oil
1-2 Tablespoons Corn Starch
Salt & Pepper to taste

RECIPE

Chop the green onions, water chestnuts, and tofu into small bite sized pieces. Then, take about 1/5 of each ingredient and chop that portion more finely for use inside the wontons. Set aside.
Chopped Ingredients

Thinly slice mushrooms. Set aside.
Sliced Mushrooms

Set up a work station with the wrappers; a glass of cool water; a clean, dry plate to make the wontons; a plate covered lightly in corn starch; and the finely chopped ingredients.
Wonton Making Station

To make the wontons, put a single wrapper in the center of the clean plate. Place an appropriate amount of each ingredient onto the wrapper (don’t overstuff the wrapper or it will tear when you take the next steps). With a slightly wet finger, moisten all for edges of the wrapper. Fold one corner of the wrapper up to it’s opposite corner, and firmly seal all edges together. Place the completed wontons on the corn starch plate, taking care not to lay them on top of each other to prevent them from sticking together.
NOTE #1: If you have any leftover wonton “filling”, just save it and throw it into the soup at the appropriate time.
Making Wontons

Place broth into properly sized sauce pan or wok and bring to a boil. While many recipes call for you to boil your wontons, I find that doing so tends to create very soft wontons that readily fall apart. To combat this, I like to steam them before adding them to the soup. It should only take 5-8 minutes to fully steam the wontons.
NOTE #2: By using this Man Pans Stir Fry Wok and Steamer Set, I am able to steam the wontons with the boiling veggie stock. Not only is this convenient and eco-friendly, I think it also adds to the flavor of the wontons.
Boiling Broth/Steaming Wontons

When wontons are fully steamed, remove the steamer insert and add the tofu, mushrooms, and water chestnuts. Return to boil for another 3-5 minutes.
Adding Ingredients

Reduce flame, add green onions and sesame oil. Gently add wontons. Salt and pepper to taste. Stir gingerly. Allow to simmer for 10 minutes.
NOTE #3: If you are adverse to any kind of spiciness, just go with the plain variety of sesame oil. But, if you like just a hint of tang, go for the “chili” version. It won’t make it very spicy at all, but it will add a nice essence.
Cooking Wonton Soup

Serve in bowls along with any of your other Asian favorites. It also makes a fine main course, too.
HINT: This soup is easily transformed into a carnivore version by using the filling from our Lamb Wontons instead. Just be sure not to fry them, as described in the recipe. Also, you may have to steam them for a few more minutes to make sure they are cooked enough. Add some shrimp or chicken chunks to the initial broth boil and you’ll have a delicious meat-lovers rendition of this soup.
Veggie Wonton Soup

If you’d like to win one of these Man Pans Stir Fry Wok and Steamer Sets, or even an entire set of their pans, be sure to enter our Want Pans? Giveaway. Hurry, though, because the contest ends 12/15/2010.
EDIT: THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED!

Prep Time = 40 minutes
Cook Time = 20 minutes
Serves 6

©2010 Caution: Caveman Cooking/UHearMe, Inc. All rights reserved. This recipe originally appeared on the Caution: Caveman Cooking blog at http://cavemancooking.net authored by Caveman. This recipe may be shared and reprinted as long as this entire copyright message accompanies it.

Posted in Asian, Main Course, Soups, Vegetarian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 25 Comments »